Why do I paint?

Stuart Bush, Untitled study, Why do I paint? Stuart Bush Studio Blog
©Stuart Bush, Untitled sketch book, oil on paper
The need to make sense of this world through painting began a long time ago. The oldest known cave paintings where more than 64,000 years ago.  Why do I paint? I feel a deep need to communicate something.  Something I can’t put into words.
 
Painting is my way of finding kindred spirits. When I look at art from the past, I realise I am not that dissimilar to my ancestors and painters of the past. Studying art from the past allows me to explore the many different ways that artists saw the world during their time.  It helps me to broaden my perspective and understanding and allows me to see how today’s art records the present moment that we live now.
 

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Although many people see painting as being based on traditional values and having a limitation in its ability to address contemporary issues, I believe that art offers the challenge of finding new meanings. I see art as a way of creating new insight and uniquely capturing people’s imagination. However some might see this view of painting as naive and believe that nothing is truly original in this postmodern society.
 
But for me, other forms of communication cannot compare with the excitement of art. They don’t come close to allowing me the opportunity to look in detail at interesting and unexplained concepts.  As a painter I have unique relation to the world and I am interested in what I can discover through art. 
 

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I find myself drawn to expressing an alternative views of life through my art.  I want to communicate what I see and explore what I can’t see.  A pencil or paint helps me to digest and reflex what is taking place. I make work about the things I think need interpreting and understanding.
Why do I paint? Stuart Bush Studio Blog
©Stuart Bush, Untitled study, oil paint on paper
Through painting, I have a chance to investigate something that is evasive, beyond what can be explained in words.  I continually ask myself what it is that I see. I try hard to identify what it is, as it continuously slips.  It is utterly instinctive and for me the process of painting is addictive.  I never get a chance to wonder what it would be like to do something other than painting because what l love about painting is that one can never undo the last mark.
 
“Art helps people express experiences that are too difficult to put into words.”

The Connection Between Art, Healing, and Public Health, by Heather L. Stuckey and Jeremy Nobel
 
I’m always hoping for improvement through my art.  However, I realise that grasping the frightening clarity of the world is unattainable. Nevertheless, that doesn’t stop me coming back to the easle to try again. But the question always arises; have l finished, do I risk spoiling it by continuing or do I start a new painting?  I love taking risks, as l try to unlock the world about me.
 
I have a deep down urge to try to master this form of expression which allows me to communicate my unique view. When I am painting I feel like I have found what I am here for. I get deep joy along with despair, anxiety and yet confidence. I feel more alive. 

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