Picasso paints want he knows rather what he sees

Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy, Tate Modern (8th March – 9th September)  
 
Installation view of The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy with Pablo Picasso’s Girl Before a Mirror (1932)  © Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2018
 
The subject of this exhibition ‘Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy,’ is the influence of love, fame and tragedy on Picasso’s painting over a one year period.  This year-long output is a rich visual diary which gives away a great deal about the artist; from his professional career to the way he worked and his personal life.  There are more the one hundred pieces of artwork, showing his entanglements with love and fame, his convolutions with colour and form, and his intricacies as the 20th century’s most influential artist.  
 
Using this review, I am seeking to unpick how a highly accomplished artist approached and explored form, colour and space in his work with the intention of helping me in my journey as an artist.
 
The Dream, 1932 Oil paint on canvas 1299 x 968mm Private Collection © Sussession Picasso/DACS London, 2018
 
The first room of this impressive exhibition starts in January and moves forward throughout a particularly special year in Picasso life.  Most of the work is referenced to a single day in 1932.   My first thoughts were how impressive his daily output was. It is hard to imagine working at such speed day after day and producing such high-quality work.  Picasso made his paintings feel like a grand and confident experiment.  He gave himself permission to trust his instincts and senses.  Rather than using direct observation, he preferred to work from memory, focusing beyond what he could see.  The result was an operation of his mind. Picasso said, “I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them.”

 

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Rose Wylie exhibition review; the benefits of having an independent studio practice

Picasso started each painting with a simple outline drawn on the canvas.  The free and loose drawings of curves, contours and form feel as if they spring from discovery. They give his paintings a visual rhythm and a harmony of fragmented structures. The abstract shapes work independently but at the same time together, as they each have a direct impact on the next form.  They all come together creating striking compositions, filled with movement.
 
In working this way, Picasso is always looking for a new way to read the world and express a new visual vocabulary. As my eyes wandered around his paintings l was amazed and intrigued by how effortless Picasso makes his beautiful pictures look.  The colours and forms of the painting respond to each other.  
 
The Rescue 1932 oil paint on canvas 1300 x 975 x 25mm Foundation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel, Sammlung Beyeler ©Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018
Picasso was interested in colour and had the intention to outshine his closet friend and rival Matisse in all areas.  After visiting ‘Matisse: The Cut-Out’, in 2014, and comparing the two artists work, in my view it is clear that Matisse had the upper hand when it came to colour. Picasso often used a joyful palette to create a warm and expressive ambience and at times with paintings like, ‘Seated Woman by a Window’,1932, Picasso’s use of colour creates dynamic energy and audacity of simplicity.  But to me, colour came second in Picasso work. It is not a fundamental part of his work; instead, it is often an afterthought.  
 

External links to review of this exhibition

 
Picasso creative genius lays not in the use of colour as an integral part of his work, but in his ability to understand and manipulate form. Picasso could view the structure from multiple directions, clearly shown in his cubist work, and combine these many viewpoints.  In capturing three-dimensional forms, in two-dimensional drawings, paintings and in his sculpture, Picasso clearly shows a highly advanced genius. His creative talent and mastery are distinctly evident in the subtleties of his advanced spatial awareness. Picasso plainly indicates he has the self-belief and confidence to push this as the dominant theme in his work and this is where he can outperform his friends and rivals.
 
Installation view of EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy with Pablo Picasso’s Nude Green Leaves and Bust ©Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018
I found the exhibition and following one year in the life of Picasso immensely successful.  It enabled me to consider what was going on in many parts of his life and how through evident self-confidence in his own abilities he was able to handle all that life threw at him. This exhibition will have a significant impact on my work. I see similarities in Picasso’s processes and topics that I can learn from.  I think the biggest take away for me from this exhibition is Picasso self-belief and confidence and how prolific and dedicated he was to his work. Picasso’s bristling energy unquestionably comes through.  
 
From the radical simplification of a form, you can see the building blocks of abstraction. He uses his artistic skills to the full to capture three-dimensional understanding.  Each shape seems to be the product of another shape.  Picasso said, “Cubism is neither a seed nor a foetus, but an art dealing primarily with forms, and when a form is reloaded it is there to live its own life.”
 
Installation view of The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy with Pablo Picasso’s The Three Dancers and Woman in the Garden ©Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018

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Review of All too human

Drawing, The creative act

©Stuart Bush, I’m not mad at all, oil paint on paper

Allowing freedom in the studio for creative exploration is essential. When I work on a plain sheet of paper or in my sketchbook, I seek to have an openness in my drawings that allows and embraces a large number of directions and options that can be pursued. A chain of evolution takes place in my pictures over an extended period of time and patience is essential. Working on and towards a finished piece too early can make the outcome contrived and often can leave me frustrated.

This explorative phase is more like a problem-creation stage than a problem-solving stage. I am looking to generate new ideas to stimulate my visual imagination and leaving space for creativity and ambiguity. I have often found that without this freeness, the development and exploratory of my thoughts are restricted, and the work comes to a dead end.

With creative freedom in my drawings, my insight and intuition give me an inkling of what to do next allowing me to focus on specific issues and open questions. I can then remove certain details and concentrate on the whole by copying and repeating to expand conceptual ideas and structures by following a hunch.  

Inspiration is an essential ingredient and can come from chaotic and imprecise work made with an open mind or by viewing another artist’s work or for me, by being inspired by the city. Accidents and chance can lead to seeing embedded ideas in a different way. The freeness leaves space to suggest moods and emotions and enhancing abstract concepts. I often feel the need to revisit unresolved ideas and expanding on them. Sometimes this leads to radical changes and often, exciting new artwork.

It is always important to remember that overworking can remove the essence, spirit, the actual original thoughts, and potential. The outcome is successful when the liberty and pleasure are still visible. After all seemingly effortless art signifies greatness and shows the way forward for an artist who can then capture what is immaterial into the material.

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©Stuart Bush, No exit, pen on paper 43 x 61 cm

A dialogue between me and my work

©Stuart Bush, Strange Heart Sings, oil on board 30 x 40 cm

I have an inherent need to communicate and express something. I am constantly looking for a new way to read the world to understand the physicality of forms. I see my practice as an exercise of being a painter/curator of moments of our lives; reclaiming a more agreeable melody, restoring, reordering and decluttering to focus on what is truly important.

By focusing on the space and the possibilities of structure and composition, I hope to emphasise the beauty and harmony from the chaos in the city, to invoke a new reading of its noise, movement and pattern. By revealing things through a slow open process, my work uncovers the importance of the positive and negative space. Where rhythm, colour and form play off each other, and each shape takes it configuration and meaning from the next, as a metaphor for the qualities of a seductive poem or an intriguing piece of music.

There is truth in the paintings as I try to deal with the present tense and how these ephemeral junctures were for me. A situation and context where discoveries and revelations happen. There is a layered time as I grapple with evidence of awkward moments, aspects of failure and changes of direction. Leaving the physical traces of responding to mistakes, that relate to intrinsic qualities of being human.

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A painting has to stand up by itself

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