Finding a love for collecting art

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Inclination of form, finding a love for collecting art
©Stuart Bush, Inclination of form, oil on canvas
I believe finding a love for collecting art is about finding an artist with a kindred spirit to yourself.  Artists critique all areas of life, from nature to politics to the social system.  They look not just on the surface, but they investigate and ask questions in order to seek new meanings and associations.  
 
When I come across a work that l feel a connection with, I write down the artist’s name.  I also Iook for websites and galleries that exhibit the said artist’s work, and I join their mailing lists. I can then delight in opening my inbox and finding compelling communication.
 
My advice is to broaden your outlook and build up knowledge about different types of art.  By improving your understanding of art, it can help you feel more confident with finding a work of art to purchase.  It is easy to find images and text about artist’s work on the internet, and the information can prove to be very informative.

Related post to; Finding a love for collecting art

A painting has to stand up by itself
 
Understandably, there may be apprehension when starting an art collection.  Artwork can seem a hard thing to put a value on.  Negative thoughts of potentially wasting money can stop impulse purchases. But with careful research, you can avoid the feeling of making an oversight.  A website like artnet.com or a artist’s website can be a very useful place to start.
 
There are many different price points.  Owning an original painting will be at a different price point than owning a print.  It is all about what price you’re happy with.  Next is the question when finding art that you love, is to ask yourself ‘ls there anything more important I need to spend my money on?’ However, if you see an artwork that speaks to you, who cares what price you paid as long you love the work.  
 

Related post to; Finding a love for collecting art

How I see art contributing to society
 
There are a lot of people who look to others to say what is good or bad, valuable and valueless. Following the crowd is easy. On the other hand, sometimes a work of art just grabs you and you can’t stop thinking about it.  When art is this good, any research on the artist or the artist sales history can feel meaningless.  If you love it and the work is set at a reasonable price, the artwork strikes a chord, then buying the artwork straight from the artist can develop into a relationship.  A relationship where the collector is supporting the artist directly.   
 
This kind of relationship is beneficial for both parties.  For the collector, they are collaborating and directly engaging with the artist. The collector can aid and abet the artist to further explore and to realise projects.  For the artist, they appreciate advocates of their art, it boosts their self-belief and helps to finances more work.  
 
Finding a love for art to me is about awakening your senses. Who cares what is fashionable or what other people think.  I don’t think these concepts should be considered when someone purchases art.  
 
When art asks, ‘what is the meaning of this?’ and ‘what’s it all about?’  it makes life visible.  And I can’t help being intrigued.  
 

Related post to; Finding a love for collecting art

A painting has to stand up by itself
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My typical day as a painter

When it is advisable to be wrong, increasing learning in the studio, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
©Stuart Bush, When it is advisable to be wrong 2016 oil on board 45.7 x 60.1 cm
Since I have been a parent, my typical day as a painter starts with waking up between 6 and 6:30 am.   I have a clear head in the morning and I have learnt to appreciate this early start as it allows me to catch up with any writing l have to do. 
 
Everyone else in the house is up by 7:30 and then l enjoy spending quality time with the family.  I help my boys with their homework and get them ready for school. I really appreciate these enjoyable family moments.  I look forward to the short walk to school.  On the way back I have the opportunity to start thinking about my first tasks in the studio.  
 

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Increasing learning in the studio
 
 
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, When it is advisable to wrong, My typical day as a painter
Stuart Bush, When it is advisable to be wrong, work in progress
 
For the next three hours its time to put my head in the rabbit hole.  First, I remove all distractions from the studio as I don’t want to be reactive to any outside influences.  Then l immerse myself in painting.  This typically takes me until my stomach lets me know its lunch time.

External links;

Jerry Saltz: How to be an artist
 
If I have managed to achieve all this by lunchtime I feel like I have already won the day.  I have completed sixty minutes or so of writing. Ninety minutes with my family and two to three hours of painting.  Now that my main priorities are achieved, I see the rest of the day as flexible.  If I still feel inspired, I can return to the studio or I can get on with business or home tasks until it’s time to pick the children up from school. 
 
I always look forward to walking to school and being able to ask the children about their day. I then spend the rest of the day with the family. I may do some reading, writing or play games with the family or even do fitness exercises.  If I have any free time, I try to catch up on what is left of my business tasks or studio tasks. 
 
Then the only task left to do is to decide what am going to paint the next day.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, increasing learning in the studio, My typical day as a painter
Stuart Bush, When it is advisable to be wrong, work in progress

Ernest Hemingway offered this advice for writing, but I think it suits any creative activity. “The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next. If you do that every day when you are writing a novel, you will never be stuck. That is the most valuable thing I can tell you so try to remember it.” I have found the advice very valuable.

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Places I go for inspiration

Wishing for dyslexia

The Rush, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
©Stuart Bush The rush 2016 oil on canvas 50 x 70 cm – SOLD
I recently read a book by Malcolm Gladwell called David and Goliath. The theme of the book highlights how we are misled about the nature of our advantages and disadvantages.  Gladwell explains that it isn’t always correct that our disadvantages preventing us being successful in life.  “We have a definition in our heads of what an advantage is — and the definition isn’t right. And what happens as a result? It means that we make mistakes. It means that we misread battles between underdogs and giants. It means that we underestimate how much freedom there can be in what looks like a disadvantage.”
 
In chapter four, Gladwell starts with the question, ‘You won’t wish dyslexia on your child, or would you?.’ Gladwell explains that when you’re dyslexic to overcome reading and writing issues, dyslexics really have to work extremely hard. That extra effort to compensate for your disadvantages develops into new advantages.  Malcolm says, “If you take away the gift of reading, you give the gift of listening.”  In my case rather than listening I developed the gift of seeing.
 
While battling with comprehension as a dyslexic, I had to concentrate extremely hard. I learnt to look harder and more deeply while fighting to understand and comprehend what I was reading.

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The benefits of adversity
The usual strategy for learning to read is to be able to break down words and understand each syllable. Enabling the reader to form the words by saying the sounds. I was told by a psychologist when I completed a dyslexia test that I have learnt to memorise thousands of words whole.  For this strategy to work, I have developed an advanced visual memory to compensate for my weakness.  To me, this makes a lot of sense as I am not good with reading and spelling words I am less familiar with.
 
 
I believe that what Gladwell talked about in his book is very interesting. I think this idea broadens as Gladwell noted and is the reason why many dyslexics end up becoming artists. Through seeing and thinking thoroughly, they continue to struggle to understand the world.  Dyslexics are often resourceful individuals, and they continually look for a solution. Dyslexics develop and build an advanced visual memory, they start to notice what others ignore.  
 
This happens to me, I start to ask questions when I notice something I find interesting. I ask, has anyone else observed this?  If they have, surely they would have painted it or draw attention to it another way.  I continue looking around to see if anyone has in case I have overlooked it and missed it.  After a while, I began to trust that these things that I have noticed have probably been ignored.  
 

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How technology Helped Me Cheat Dyslexia
Then I start the journey of processing these things of interest. Looking at them even more profoundly. I play with them in my head and in a sketchbook turning them into a variety of outcomes in order to see what works.  The hardest part is to look and see if I can turn it into successful artwork.  This is really what an artist’s role is, to think deeply about what hasn’t been noticed and draw attention to it.
 
Gladwell highlights this fact in the book, “An extraordinarily high number of entrepreneur are dyslexic about a third…There are two possible interpretations for this remarkable fact. One is that this extraordinary group of people triumphed in spite of their disability. That they are so smart and so creative, that nothing, not even a lifetime of struggling with reading could stop them. The second more intriguing possibility that they achieve in part because of the disorder.  That they learnt something in their struggle to be at an enormous advantage. Would you wish dyslexia on your child?”
 
George Bernard Shaw, “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world,  The unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore, all progress relies on the unreasonable man.”
 

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Dyslexia isn't going to stop me

A section of ourselves as a commodified object

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, A section of ourselves as a commodified object, A section of ourselves as a commodified object
©Stuart Bush, A section of ourselves as a commodified object, oil on aluminium panel, 80 x 120cm
To achieve a successful painting like, ‘A section of ourselves as a commodified object’, I want to understand what it is I am really trying to make. I have a deep need to be creative and communicate something significant about what I see. I love painting, my ambition is to make the best painting I can make. For me, a transformative experience takes place at the level of the ordinary.  
 
When evaluating a picture, it is interesting to consider that the essences of the surface is a pattern of colours, lines, texture, forms and space.  Shape and form fit into the frame, as the structure of the painting creates a visual complexity.  I find a dynamic placement satisfying and enticing as it encourages eyes to follow a predetermined direction.  
 

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What it takes to paint something original
By turning figurative forms into a flat plane, I hope to make a visually engaging and attention holding painting.  I am also creating a comment about how the abstract figure in the history of art is turned into a sign or symbol for market value.  In effect, I recycle, reuse and take advantage of our human form and individuality for the commercialisation of the self and of our human identity. 
 
My focus isn’t on financial gain.  However, an artist, like everyone else, needs to make a living. I like the idea of art for art’s sake but a painting whether you like it or not turns into a commodity. As an artist, I live off what I make and of the form of others in my work.  
 

Inspiring external related link;

Michael Landy's Artange project 'Breakdown'

I cannibalise the individual form into an image for commercial value. The commercialisation of the self and human identity de-humanises us. This is the reason why I paint a section of ourselves as a commodified object.

Compared to the various others ways to make a living this seems an honest and honourable one.  I am not saying there is anything wrong with making a living from art or any other form of making a living.  By trying to make the best painting I can, I wanted to look at this most fundamental part of the art.  Looking at the deal that follows.  The legacy of the history of art is its commercialisation.
 
I don’t have to sell my work, but there isn’t much point in making it unless other people see it. By getting to grips with all this, I hope to make the best painting I can make.
 

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I wish I could paint everyday

The influential work of Francis Bacon – Stuart Bush Studio Blog

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Hopes and Fears, The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
©2016 Stuart Bush, Hopes and Fears, (2007) oil on canvas 150 x 85 cm
When I was starting out as an artist, I was having trouble with feelings about the purpose of our human existence. I related to Karl Marx talking about the problems of consumerism and the alienation of labour. Marx stated that if you are cut off from the fruits of your work, then you are cut off from your creativity, and you lose your sense of self. This introspection on existentialism and the influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter as a creative outlet for my thoughts.
 
I realised I was happiest when I was making something.  It needed to be something for me that doesn’t have the main aim of making money.  I feel that this is one of the main problems with the western consumeristic society. People often lose connection with their output. They complete a task just to make money, just to survive. I believe the goal of making money causes psychological problems with our individual purpose and happiness.
 

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How I see art contributing to society
During the process of making art, I feel the artwork becomes an extension of me. I get closer to my deeper self.  Through painting, my purpose stretches out before me. I realised no one else can make another painting precisely the same. No-one else has my thoughts. This powerful idea that I am unique and I can communicate what I feel really resonates with my heart.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Francis Bacon, Figure at the base of crucifixion, The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
©Francis Bacon, Figures at the base of crucifixion 1944, 1 panel part of a triptych
After learning about Francis Bacon at art school, and seeing Bacon’s work at several exhibitions in London, including his major retrospective at the Tate in 2008, I saw the way forward. I immediately related to his work and understood it.  As Bacon puts it, “art is about trying to make something out of the chaos of existence.”
 
To enable me to communicate my feeling of angst and estrangement with the world, I realised I could paint the figure in the city. Since I grew up in the country, I found the city fascinating and it is where I felt increasingly heighten feelings of alienation.
 

Related links: The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter

Tate interactive tour of 2008 Francis Bacon exhibition
 
I was in a trance by the power of Bacon’s large canvases. Bacon depicted the complexity and chaos that was going on around me and inside me.  His paintings focused on the invisible forces that underlie me. I strongly relate to the feelings of angst and disorientation.  
 
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, The Kingdom, The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
©Stuart Bush, The Kingdom, oil on canvas 150 x 85 cm
I realised Bacon wasn’t only interested in directly painting a representation of life. He wanted to heighten the viewer’s feelings. His paintings were created by using raw instinct and chance.  Often there is a single figure in Bacon’s paintings, the individual that creates a tremendous force that twists, contorts and stretches out.  Bacon’s striking depictions stirred my emotions with the immediacy, and with the deep and lasting impact of his art.
 
I deeply related to Bacon’s paintings and felt painting was the perfect way I could communicate my thoughts.  What I like about Bacon’s approach is that he is not trying to understand the human condition, Bacon realises he cannot.  If he could explain it, there would be no reason to paint it.  Bacon was instead trying to get you to feel what he feels.  He portrays a figure, not as an educated, cultured, pillar of the community but instead as nothing but a raw piece of meat. It is direct, honest and compelling.  Francis Bacon explains it eloquently, “the job of the artist is always to deepen the mystery.”  Francis Bacon had a tremendous impact on me.  Inspiring me to follow in his footsteps and to become a painter.
 

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The inspiral work of Egon Schiele - Stuart Bush Studio Blog

What it takes to paint something original

paint something original
©Stuart Bush, Strange Heart Sings, oil on board 30 x 40 cm
When I started out on my journey, like most art students, my ultimate goal was to communicate what I see.  I was inspired by other artist’s work. As a consequence, I wanted to make my own significant contribution to culture. When everything has been done before, to have any chance of achieving this goal, I realised it’s important to understand how to paint something original and unique. In this post, I discuss what I have uncovered on my artistic journey.
 
In the book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell explains his thoughts about his ‘10,000-hour-rule’ as, “the magic number of greatness.”  Gladwell’s idea is that originality only comes after spending 10,000 hours mastering a subject.  This rule makes a lot of sense to me. It is helpful as a guide to appreciating what it takes to paint something original.
Stuart Bush Studio, No bodies fault, I wish I could paint every day
©Stuart Bush Nobodies fault detail,
I believe looking is the most essential part of being an artist, especially for a painter.  Only after looking can you begin to realise what has been overlooked and then you can start to recognise what is already valued. Plus after reading about and viewing a lot of accomplished art you can start to understand the importance of making great art, and that originality is subjective. As I became aware of what art critics and sophisticated people thought l started to develop my own ideas about what was successful or unsuccessful. 

Related post; What it takes to paint something original

Jealously of other artist's work
This was the beginning of finding my own voice and my own unique visual ideas as an artist then an armed with a pencil, a blank sheet of paper and an open mind l can be transported to a place where ideas become instinctive, intuitive and spontaneous. 
 
I realise I am more likely to stumble across originality when I am making and taking risks. Accidents from unintended footprints, coffee cups rings, photocopiers, spills and other accidents all have their place. They happen when I least expect them and I learn as much from these apparent failures as I do from successes.  
©Stuart Bush, He has never been in love, he doesn’t even know what love is. Gouache on cartridge paper, 43 x 24 cm
 
Open creative sessions leave my thoughts uncovered and on display in their raw state and my ego is left aside. The energy and emotions in the preliminary drawings come from this outburst of freedom. They can be refined by repeating on another sheet. These ideas can be further explored and refined, but at that point, the conscious self comes back into the room.  The work from open-ended creation sessions can often be more prized than the problem solving finished work that follows. Getting this balance right is an essential part of painting something original.

External link; What it takes to paint something original

Is originality in art overrated? - Royal Academy of Art
 
After completing the preliminary studies l often don’t know the potential of the work. Often l store it away and revisit it at a later time.  This time away helps me to realise and appreciate its potential. I am always hoping to find an appropriate form that brings everything together in order to discover something fresh and insightful.  
Stuart Bush Studio, the rush
©Stuart Bush The rush 2016 oil on board 50 x 70 cm
Nevertheless, it is important to throw away what doesn’t work and quickly move on. This can be one of the biggest stumbling blocks for an artist.  New work can be a shadow or an echo of what the artist has seen or experienced before.  Selecting, editing and reworking is an essential process that leads to originality.  The artist’s studio is a place for demolition, revival and transformation.
 
Chuck Close, the New York painter, has this to say,  
“We often don’t know what we want to do, but we sure as hell know what we don’t want to do.  So the choice not to do something is often more important than the choice to do something.”  
I have discovered that a problem creation process is much more effective in finding exciting and original ideas than a problem-solving approach.
 

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I wish I could paint every day

Dyslexia isn’t going to stop me

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Dyslexia isn't going to stop me, A section of ourselves as a commodified object
©Stuart Bush, A section of ourselves as a commodified object, oil on aluminium panel, 80 x 120cm
I avoided practising my reading and writing skills as I grew up. I easily slipped through the net due to changing schools several times. It took me a long time to read a book, however, I started to enjoy reading in my twenties. At 27 years old I was diagnosed with dyslexia. It took me a while to realise that dyslexia wasn’t going to stop me.
 
I didn’t enjoy writing before I had a blog. I always felt my writing was poor. The way I used to get my ideas down on paper was confused and in a jumble. In spite of that, I believed that my ideas and content were good. It used to take an enormous amount of hard work to take my ideas and make them into a finished piece of writing.
 
It is almost impossible to become an artist without being able to communicate clearly. I needed to not only to be able to write about my work but also talk about it. Hearing that there are lots of successful people with dyslexia encouraged me. I thought to myself, ‘It didn’t hold them back, so it isn’t going to hold me back! I need to face my fears”

External link – Dyslexia isn’t going to stop me

How Technology Helped Me Cheat Dyslexia
 
The only way I was going to improve was through practice. One of the main reasons l started writing my blog was for myself, for my own improvement. 
 
My purpose and the reasons why I write has developed over time. Now use my blog to explain and demystify how to establish a successful artistic practice. I give a raw unfiltered analysis, sharing what I find with others in order to help them develop a way forward with making art and becoming successful.  Through collaborating as artists, we can figure things out together. When you read, comment or purchase a work of mine you are collaborating with me on this journey.
 
In the beginning, writing this blog stuartbushstudioblog.com was like a type of therapy.  However, because of this journey, of facing what I fear, I now feel stronger as an artist. The best part is that I now enjoy writing!  I wonder if I have a book in me.

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The Benefits of Adversity

What is my motivation as an artist?

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Inclination of form, What is my motivation to be an artist?
©Stuart Bush, Inclination of form, oil on canvas

My motivation as an artist has to do with my intense need to communicate something that only I can do or say. I have a meaning to fulfil through my work, and I am declaring that as an artist that I am responsible for finding answers.

Painting is the best way for me to communicate. I believe that painting and playing with form has the potential to capture the most important kinds of expression. I see it as a foundation for thinking itself and solving life’s complexities.
 
I’m interested in expressing the physical vigour of the human body in the city landscape as a means of exercising the freedom and dynamic expressions of space.  Through my work, I am confident I can widen and broaden the visual field, thereby revealing a whole new spectrum. 
 

Links – What is my motivation as an artist?

25 Reasons Why Being an Artist is the Best - JerryArtarama.com
The outcome of my work evokes a surprise and a revelation to me in much the same way as it does to the viewer.  The finished painting is never good enough.  In order to fill this gap, I have the motivated to make another piece of work.
 
Throughout my career, I have tested things out and applied my knowledge. What I learn I will share, from practical advice to techniques and any other information l think might be useful. I will be fighting in the trenches with you, explaining and demystify how an artist can support a creative life.
 

How I see art contributing to society

Christo, The London Mastaba, Hyde Park 2018, Stuart Bush Studio Blog, painting blog
Christo, The London Mastaba, Hyde Park 2018
When I saw Christo’s new art project in Hyde Park London and read his quote, “A work of art is a scream of freedom,” I know I needed to tell you about how I see art contributing to society.
 
Every artist contributes to society in their own special way. Artists look to find ways to engage the wider pubic through their work to consider and reconsider the way they see the world. Whether it is contributing to overall health and wellbeing of our society by rethinking about what we are doing and considering in new approaches or by providing inspiration, interaction and joy to uplift the spirit.

Link to a review of Christo, The London Mastaba

Independent: Christo's latest sculpture weighs 600 tons (and it floats)
 
Being an artist for me is a licence to look deeply; to follow my curiosity, to unpick and to make new connections with what I see. We live on this small rock in a massive universe without an accurate understanding of what it is all about.  I perceive making art as a form of therapy to open up the world and open up people’s minds to a higher spectrum. To deal with and come to terms with everyday life.  
 
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, untitled sketch, in the city, How I see art contributing to society?
Stuart Bush, untitled sketch
“The first step to controlling your world is to control your culture. To model and demonstrate the kind of world you demand to live in. To write the books. Make the music. Shoot the films. Paint the art.” Chuck Palahniuk, American novelist and journalist
 
To my eyes painting is the best way to communicate and connect with others within a collective effort. I am not trying to convey the world as I see it.  As an artist, I absorb it and try to communicate the world as it really is.
 
I have an intellectual curiosity and commitment to bring the truth to light. Through my art making, I want to be known for using my artistic creativity to widen and broaden the visual field.  Therefore, reveal a whole new range of potential meaning.
 
There are many benefits of living in an exciting contemporary culture. I see myself as part of a community whose work can make a significant contribution to society and the world today.  I want to contribute to human growth by joining into the conversation.   

 

 
“If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him.” John F Kennedy

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I wish I could paint every day

Jealousy of other artist’s work

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Jealousy of other artist's work
Stuart Bush, Sanctuary exhibition
As we grow up, there is lots of pressure on us to fit into society. We sometimes look with envious eyes at what others have achieved. At school, it is intellectual abilities that seem to count and in the media popular attractive pin-ups stand out.  As we compare ourselves to others we can conclude that we are just not good enough. These thoughts can affect our ego and our spirit. If we withdraw we lose our footing, and then, when we try again, come up short. If we are not careful this can grow up into jealousy of other artist’s work and achievements.
 
When I was an art student I looked at a wide range of art. Enviability I was blown away by the work of successful artists.  I compared my skills, talent, ability, knowledge and my output against what other artists produced. I ended up continually watching what others were doing. The outcome was inevitable. These thoughts began to limit my ability to think creatively, and they became overwhelming. I started to feel I didn’t deserve to be an artist and it threatened my self-worth.

A way forward without being jealous of other artist’s work

To be a successful artist I needed to figure out a way to unlearn what was causing me harm. A way was to stop comparing myself to others. It was counterproductive feeling. I realised that there was no way I was able to make the same work as another artist, and I didn’t want to.
 
I realised that l should not be competing with other artists, I needed to run my own race. It’s my process and my path. My work isn’t going to look like other artists.  I am now fully aware that if I get distracted by looking at other artist’s outputs, I will lose my energy and focus. If l allow myself to become distracted then I will have to learn to refocus and listen to my inner voice again.

Links related to Jealousy of other artist’s work

Why You Should Stop Caring What Other People Think

I now give myself artistic permission to be myself and make what I want. It is important to be acknowledged for my individuality and I have different strengths to my peers. I look at what makes me unique, and push it forward in my work.

Now when I need inspiration, I look in lots of places. I may look at other artist’s work to learn their processes but I don’t compare my output with their output. Instead, I feed off the creative ideas, take what l want and develop my own perspective and viewpoint.  I avoid jealousy of other artist’s work because my own ideas are developing and growing.

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Jealousy of other artists's work
Stuart Bush, Sanctuary exhibition

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The benefits of adversity