Understanding the ‘Oak Tree’ in conceptual art via Russian politics

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Oak Tree, Conceptual art
©1973 Michael Craig Martin, An Oak Tree (1973) – All rights are reserved and are with the artist. 
 
Understanding the ‘Oak Tree’ in conceptual art via Russian politics
 
I have always had an intellectual curiosity about the principles and ideas behind conceptual art. In Michael Craig-Martin’s artwork, ‘Oak Tree’ (1973), I am interested in how he claims to transform a glass water into an ‘Oak Tree’?  How does the artist subvert people’s observations of the world?
 
I had fresh insight into understanding this artwork and mental concept after recently watching a film by Adam Curtis called, ‘How propaganda turned Russian politics into a circus.’ The documentary discusses and explains how Russian politics is using conceptual ideas from the art world to confuse people so that they are never sure what exactly is occurring.
 
Vladislav Surkov is an advisor to Vladimir Putin. Surkov was an aspiring artist who trained as a theatre director.  He has imported ideas from conceptual art into Russian politics and thereafter into Russian daily life.  

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What I see in the work of Jeff Koons
 
This came to the attention of the UK after the Friday 2 March 2018 Salisbury attack.  Two men from the Russia military intelligence service, the GRU, entered the UK from Russia.  Police believe that the two men travelled during the weekend to Salisbury.  It is alleged that while they were there they contaminated the front door of the home of Sergei and Yulia Skripal. Sergei Skripal is a former Russian agent who has defected to the west. Sergei and Yulia Skripal were found collapsed on a bench in Salisbury.  They had been poisoned with a chemical weapon called Novichok.   Later DS Nick Bailey also fell ill after going to their home.
 
In Curtis’s film, he explains that the Kremlin is very calculating. They intended to create a sense of confusion and falseness where no one is able to find the truth. This is similar to the way the artwork, ‘An Oak Tree’ attempts to create uncertainty.
 

Further reading on understanding conceptual art

Marcel Duchamp 'Fountain' (1917)
The initiator moves the truth, like in the Salisbury attack and in the artwork, to wherever they want.  In the ‘Oak Tree’, Craig-Martin tells the viewer the glass of water on a glass shelf is an Oak Tree. In the Salisbury attack, Russia completely denies they had any involvement in the poisoning. However, officials in the UK are confident that the two Russian suspects were involved.
 
‘Gaslighting’ is the next stage of the process. This is a form of intimidation and psychological abuse where the offender denies everything, leading the victim to doubt their own perception of events.  The offender then responses like a school bully, telling everyone they are imagining things and laughing at them.  Then he draws attention to something else in order to undermine them. In this case, the Russian foreign Minister tweeted a funny video of the UK Prime Minister dancing.  In the ‘Oak Tree’ Craig-Martin draws attention to the mental conception through the questions and answers.
 

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A painting has to stand up by itself 
Last week the Russians released a film where the two suspects talk about their phoney interest in Salisbury’s history.  Their statement appears to come straight from Wikipedia. The Russians flatly deny any involvement. The outcome of this is that the UK officials to start to second guess their instincts. 
 
The whole Salisbury attack experience has given the UK and the world an insight into Russian daily life and the television they are allowed to view.  It shows to  Russian nationals who are thinking about defecting, that not only can the state find them anywhere in the world, but also that the state can leave traces back to Moscow.  If the state gets suspected or caught out they will then just laugh the problem away.
 

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How I see art contributing to society
Just like in Monty Python and the Holy Grail where the French taunt the English outside their castle.  The Russian state is saying that we know that you know we did it and we have come up with this absurd response to further humiliate you.  
 
Michael Craig-Martin said about an ‘Oak Tree’, “I was trying to work out what was the essence of a work of art. I thought it had to do with suspension of disbelief. You get it in theatre – why not in art?”
 
The Salisbury attack is very similar to the ‘Oak Tree’ (1973) artwork but with much more humiliation and an affront to the viewer.
 

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Michael Craig-Martin’s book, ‘On being an artist’ – book review

Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review

Tomma Abts, Hebe, Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Tomma Abts Serpentine Exhibition review
Tomma Abts, Fiebe, 2017 Acrylic & oil on canvas 48 × 38 cm, 18 7/8” × 15” Courtesy Private Collection
Tomma Abts (1967) is a German-born painter who lives in London. In 2006 Tomma won the Turner Prize and has since gone on to exhibit in many institutions around the world.  In this Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review, I want to discuss her interesting static compositions and consider what I think the artist wants to say through the work.
 
Tomma Abts’s quiet and unique work could never be described as pretty.  Her strange visual illusions at first glance look like 1950s wallpaper.  Each painting contains zigzags, puzzles and twists on her trademark sized 48 x 38cm canvases. Tomma worked mainly on canvases of this size for the last 20 years, only recently introducing, different sized and shaped canvas. The title of her paintings were taken from a German dictionary of first names, Uphe, Zebe, Mehm, Veeke, Meko and Noeme.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Fimme, 2013 Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review
Tomma Abts, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (7 June– 9 September 2018) © 2018 readsreads.info
Tomma was attracted to the Sackler gallery rather than the main Serpentine Gallery. She quickly realised that by leaving the powder rooms at the centre of the gallery empty with only the brickwork showing she could put her work in a sequence around the outside.   Laying out the paintings in a precise order enables her to control the sense of movement for the viewer; and links her work carefully to the architecture.  The positioning and lighting emphasises the relationships in each of her paintings between the contrast of the foreground and background.
 

Related links; Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review

Tate Audio and Video on Tomma Abts
 
Tomma begins each painting without any preconceived ideas about what the picture will look like. The first task is to use a quick wash of acrylic paint to the canvas.  This is followed by an evolution of intuitive decisions in oil paint to create sculptural paintings that add depth to the two-dimensional surface.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review
Tomma Abts, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (7 June– 9 September 2018) © 2018 readsreads.info
Tomma says, “not knowing what the outcome might be is what makes me want to start another painting.  I have no plans, sketches or preconceptions when I begin; it is just decision after decision – an ongoing process of putting something onto the canvas and then editing it, then putting something down and editing it again – and in that way slowly constructing something…The making itself leads the way. The image is the manifestation  of the process.”

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Peter Doig exhibition review
 
It is a common theme in painting that when an artist changes their mind about a previous decision they often feel compelled to hide that journey in the painted layers. There is a very long phase of searching and discovery, and trial error can be seen in each painting.  In overpainting, there are submerged shapes turning the painting into a record of compressed time and space in flux. Each painting has a life of its own and eventually arrives at a lyrical composition of colour and illusory space.  The obscured passages of rifts and forms are like previous states of mind hidden in the surface.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Tedo, 2002, Tomma Abts Serpentine Exhibition review
Tomma Abts, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (7 June– 9 September 2018) © 2018 readsreads.info
The result is a painting that uses the way forms catch the light and shadows. Tomma says, “I can’t really say what it will look like or how it will finish or what will make it work.  It’s a different idea or moment for each painting.”  Each painting has a unique relationship and balance of colour and form. 
 

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Sarah Sze Exhibition review
There is no content, leaving you wondering what point Tomma is trying to make.  The paintings are a reflection of a process. The viewer skids across the surface, trying to get a grip but failing.  The emptiness of the paintings captivate the viewer and invite reams of commentary.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Tomma Abts Serpentine Exhibition review
Tomma Abts, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (7 June– 9 September 2018) © 2018 readsreads.info
The whole exhibition feels like an artwork in itself.  My mind wondered into the thoughts of Corbusier utopian dreams for Paris.  The artworks around the outside of the gallery are like the suburbs in the peripheral areas of the city. The inner architecture, the brickwork of the powder rooms is like the working heart of the city.  The intuitive paintings, where one step leads to the next, come from Tomma’s inner architecture and soul.  The lines, forms and rhythms offer a kind of purity, with each painting having its own unique sensation.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review
Tomma Abts, Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (7 June– 9 September 2018) © 2018 readsreads.info

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Laura Owens Exhibition review

How I see art contributing to society

Christo, The London Mastaba, Hyde Park 2018, Stuart Bush Studio Blog, painting blog
Christo, The London Mastaba, Hyde Park 2018
When I saw Christo’s new art project in Hyde Park London and read his quote, “A work of art is a scream of freedom,” I know I needed to tell you about how I see art contributing to society.
 
Every artist contributes to society in their own special way. Artists look to find ways to engage the wider pubic through their work to consider and reconsider the way they see the world. Whether it is contributing to overall health and wellbeing of our society by rethinking about what we are doing and considering in new approaches or by providing inspiration, interaction and joy to uplift the spirit.

Link to a review of Christo, The London Mastaba

Independent: Christo's latest sculpture weighs 600 tons (and it floats)
 
Being an artist for me is a licence to look deeply; to follow my curiosity, to unpick and to make new connections with what I see. We live on this small rock in a massive universe without an accurate understanding of what it is all about.  I perceive making art as a form of therapy to open up the world and open up people’s minds to a higher spectrum. To deal with and come to terms with everyday life.  
 
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, untitled sketch, in the city, How I see art contributing to society?
Stuart Bush, untitled sketch
“The first step to controlling your world is to control your culture. To model and demonstrate the kind of world you demand to live in. To write the books. Make the music. Shoot the films. Paint the art.” Chuck Palahniuk, American novelist and journalist
 
To my eyes painting is the best way to communicate and connect with others within a collective effort. I am not trying to convey the world as I see it.  As an artist, I absorb it and try to communicate the world as it really is.
 
I have an intellectual curiosity and commitment to bring the truth to light. Through my art making, I want to be known for using my artistic creativity to widen and broaden the visual field.  Therefore, reveal a whole new range of potential meaning.
 
There are many benefits of living in an exciting contemporary culture. I see myself as part of a community whose work can make a significant contribution to society and the world today.  I want to contribute to human growth by joining into the conversation.   

 

 
“If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him.” John F Kennedy

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Review of ‘All too human, Bacon, Freud and a century of painting life’ Tate Britain

 
Stanley Spencer, All too human, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Stanley Spencer, 1891-1959 Patricia Preece 1933 Oil paint on canvas 839 x 736mm Southampton City Art Gallery, Hampshire © The Estate of Stanley Spencer/Bridgeman Images
‘All too human, Bacon, Freud and a century of painting life’ at Tate Britain, begins by following British painting after the Second World War. At this time in our history rumours about what had happened during the Holocaust were trickling into the media. During this period many books and essays were written as people tried to come to terms with what had taken place. This experience encouraged intellectuals to look inwards and ask hard questions about the purpose of human existence. 
 
It was complexing to hear about the atrocities and then to consider how humans could behave in such a way. The central theme of this exhibition looked at what British representational painting achieved during this period. Artists including Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Stanley Spencer, Alberto Giacometti, Frank Auerbach, Leon Kossoff, R. B. Kitaj and David Bomberg amongst others explored whether painting life as it is had any answers. They took on the battle through the depiction of the figure, the flesh and the surrounding. The painters were asking, how after this experience, could art depict man with any conviction.  
 
Francis Bacon, All too human, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Francis Bacon, 1909-1992 Portrait, 1962, Oil paint on canvas, 1980 x 1415 mm, Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen. The Lambrecht-Schadeberg Collection/Winners of the Rubens Prize of the City of Siegen © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS, London.
The lead curator Elena Crippa, and assistant curator Laura Castagnini from Tate Britain, laid out the show in chronological order. The hanging of the show highlights how the artists were influencing each other. The relationships and rivalries between teachers, mentors and friendships runs throughout this exhibition. The whole show contains approximately 100 works tracing the startling impact of this shocking time and the coming effect on following generations.
 

Related review to All too human

Picasso paints what he knows rather than what he see
 
In the first room, I was drawn to the works of  David Bomberg and Stanley Spencer. David Bomberg painted the rugged landscape of worn-torn cities capturing the light on structure and scenery. With his speciality handling of paint he tries to get a grip on the subject, simplifying what he saw. He records memories and emotional states in almost abstract shapes. Meanwhile there is forcefulness of the work of Spencer.  He paints a representation of the life, of a person in the flesh. The direct and honest painting opens up the sitter to the viewer. The painting becomes about looking more deeply at the painting itself and the process of applying it. 
 
Lucian Freud, All too human, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Lucian Freud, 1922-2011
Girl with a White Dog 1950-1
Oil paint on canvas 762 x 1016 mm © Tate
Freud, ‘In Girl with White Dog by Lucian Freud’, 1950-1 sees life for the mystery it is. Freud highlights the estrangement and coldness of the body. He once said, ‘I want the paint to work as flesh does.’ It indeed does that under his intense observation. The romance is undoubtedly removed, and there is a feeling of distress in the compelling moment of the life of his sitter.
 
Frank Auerbach, All too human, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Frank Auerbach, born 1931 Head of Jake 1997 Oil paint on board 613 x 508 mm Private Collection © Frank Auerbach, courtesy Marlborough Fine Art
In Frank Auerbach’s painting, ‘Head of Jake,’ 1997 Auerbach tries to find a new way to depict life and capture the horrifying experience. He uses shapes and colours as symbolism to show what he saw. He created a vibrant, profound visual language that extends beyond the outer appearance. There is deep emotional charge in thick impasto style penetrating loss and depths of physical structures into evidence of the forgotten moments.
 
Francis Bacon, All too human, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Francis Bacon, 1909-1992 Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud
1964 Oil paint on canvas 1980 x 1476 mm The Lewis Collection
© The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. DACS, London
Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd.
A lot of the work in this exhibition is influenced by the existentialist view that we live to suffer. Francis Bacon’s ‘Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud,’ 1964 depicts going beyond surviving and suffering through painting. Bacon sees art as “about trying to make something out of the chaos of existence.” He looks into the human condition like we are carcasses. He focuses on our alienation and disorientation of the visible world to stir emotions and tell the truth about the darkness of human characteristics.

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Hodgkin says goodbye to absent friends - Howard Hodgkin exhibition review at the National Portrait Gallery in London
 
At the end of the exhibition after seeing many great revealing and fascinating works of art, I felt I had learnt something about our purpose as humans in this world. For me, this exhibition highlights our existence while words can only fail to define it. When words are used to try and explain the physical experience they often come up short. Painting and art, in general, adds to our understanding in a substantial and meaningful way. Any outcome to these big questions without art is missing a truly more profound understanding. 
 
Celia Brown, All too human, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Cecily Brown, born 1969 Boy with a Cat 2015 Oil, pastel on linen 1092 x 1651 mm Collection of Danny and Lisa Goldberg © Cecily Brown Photo: Richard Ivey
The show concludes with a Lynette Yiadom-Boakye painting, ‘The Host Over a Barrel’ 2014 and Celia Paul ‘Painter and Model,’ 2012. Yiadom-Boakye invites the viewer to construct their own view of what she sees and ask questions about what painting is. While Paul’s meditative self-portrait captures herself as an artist contemplating and scrutinising her own form and presence as a painter of life.
 
I thoroughly enjoyed what this exhibition says about the human experience. This exhibition to me says yes to life. It questions life’s purpose and is like going into therapy. I would be interesting to know what the impact would be on an individual who has lost his way in life and whether they would say yes to life after visiting the show.
 

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The inspirational work of Egon Schiele

The inspirational work of Egon Schiele, Stuart Bush Studio
Egon Schiele, Green Stockings, all copywrites remain with the artist

One of the artists that I found the most inspiring as a student was the inspirational work of Egon Schiele. At aged 16, Egon enrolled in the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts. He died at the young age of 28. In those few years, he made some of the most enduring and intriguing work. I am very interested in understanding what it is in Egon Schiele’s work that encouraged me to follow my interest in art.

Egon Schiele was known for drawing mainly portraits and self-portraits. He worked in a striking graphic style that challenged the notion of beauty. Egon had a concise way of working, similar to a poem to conveys rich experiences and emotions.

It would be easy to have a fleeting look at Egon drawings and mistake them to be only about sexual arousal or pornography, but that misses the intent and the reason why I am drawn to his work. Egon not only shows sex as beautiful, but he also demonstrates how he questions and adores life through his work.

Egon was a prolific artist making over 3000 works over his short life. There is satisfaction from the artistry, extracting something from the seductive delights of life. Each one has an intensity and beauty capturing our physical existence and our desperation in being a person.

Related links to the inspirational work of Egon Schiele

https://www.theartstory.org/artist-schiele-egon.htm

Egon showed a unique and anguished look at our situation. I enjoyed the cropping of the frame with low direct angles in his drawings. The tortuous crooked fingers and appendages ask questions about our function, design and purpose. Each artwork generating meaning in its own way I have really enjoyed returning to look again at the work of Egon Schiele. I understand why his work gave me a purpose to be an artist. Egon Schiele’s fact-finding mission to record evidence about what life really with anger, sexual frustration and bewilderment helps you to remember how you saw the world as a young adolescent. Creating a porthole to a greater understanding of the human condition and the beauty of life.

In Egon’s drawings, he cultivated his own unique view to add to deepen our understanding of life. I continue to find his work easy to identify with and through writing this, I have a better understanding of why I followed the path into becoming an artist.

Please share with me the artists that have given you direction, purpose and sense who you might become. I recommend you check out Egon Schiele’s if you haven’t already.

Related links to the inspirational work of Egon Schiele

https://www.egon-schiele.net

What I see in the work of Jeff Koons

 

I wish I could paint every day

Stuart Bush Studio, No bodies fault, I wish I could paint every day
©Stuart Bush, Nobodies fault detail, I wish I could paint every day

I wish I could paint every day…

Every day I paint I have an adventure into the unknown.
 
Every day I am excited by the possibilities in the work.
 
Every day I paint I enjoy the production of novelty the most.
 
Every day I paint, I decide what I want to work on the night before.  My unconscious mind thinks and contemplates it overnight. The next day I effortlessly to know where to start.
 
Every day I paint I don’t make it overly complicated.
 
Every day I paint my studio has to be free from distractions so l can get into a creative flow and stay in it. I get completely caught up and saturated in what I am doing.  The painting leads the way, my hand and brush are in control rather than my brain.  I have a deep involvement with the activity and time becomes distorted.
 
Every day I paint, it is not clear what needs to be done. The solution is elusive and an accident. Only when I am in a flow of creativity, unconscious decision making takes place. I surprise myself and produce work I am happy with.
Stuart Bush Studio, No bodies fault, I wish I could paint every day
©Stuart Bush Nobodies fault detail, I wish I could paint every day
Every day I paint, I try to be satisfied when the work is complete. If I put unnecessary pressure and stress on myself and let my perfectionist outlook win, the results are never good enough to meet my standards.
 
Every day I paint I hope something good will come, but if it doesn’t I don’t worry. Whether it is good or bad, that really doesn’t matter.  When I finish, I always turn the work towards the wall and quickly move on to the next task.
 

Related post to Every day I paint;

Drawing the creative act
Every day I paint I consider the work from previous sessions and give myself feedback. This enables me to move forward. I have to decide which ideas can be developed and which direction to take and then l know what to work on during the next session.
 
Every day I paint I am unsure if I am getting anywhere.  Often I take one step forward, two steps sideways and one backwards.  Every little while I stop and look back. Over months and years rather than days I learn something new and l know l am growing as a painter and as a person.  
 
Every day I paint I am not interested in money and fame.  It’s the pursuit that counts, not the attainment.  I always enjoy and have fun within the process.
 
Every day I paint I work towards achieving something meaningful. My lifelong ambition is to make a significant contribution to culture.  In doing so, I hope to help the human condition. 
 
Every day I paint I love what I do. I love the process of making art more than the work I produce.
 
I wish I could paint every day.
 
Stuart Bush Studio, No bodies fault, I wish I could paint every day
©Stuart Bush, Nobodies fault, oil on board 70.2 x 50.4 x 3.6cm, I wish I could paint every day

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What l see in the work of Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Play-Doh, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Jeff Koons, Play-Doh (1994—2012) Newport Gallery All right reserved by the artist
 
It is easy to be impressed by the work of Jeff Koons. He has an impressive art career and has gained international success. Koons has developed a secure grip on the art market and he can make whatever he wants.  He often turns the popular; Michael Jackson with his pet monkey or scoops of Play-doh; into an expensive ceramic or stainless steel sculpture. 
 
Plus, Koons is not afraid to make work that could potentially alienate him. It is easy to sneer at his works based on topics like guilt and shame. After all, we are all bound by our own unconscious and conscious signals.  He openly encourages opinions on his art saying there is no right or wrong interpretation.  His art challenges the idea that art needs emotional depth and taste. Koons work, whether your ambivalent about it or not, it clearly reflects our age and society especially his gazing balls and balloon dog.
Jeff Koons Balloon Monkey, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Jeff Koons, Balloon Monkey (Blue) 2006-2013 Newport Gallery All rights reserved by the artist
 
 
Jeff Koons describes Balloon Dog: “It’s very mythic. There’s a sense of the interior to the piece, which is a bit like a Trojan piece. It’s very now – it’s like a balloon from a birthday party, and because it’s inflated, you imagine the birthday party was recent, not 20 years ago. A normal membrane of a balloon from 20 years ago would be completely deflated. At the same time, there’s a mythic and ritualistic quality; you can imagine people going around Balloon Dog in a sort of dance. A tribalistic quality.”
 

What I see in Jeff Koons website link

http://www.jeffkoons.com
 
However, instead of just enjoying his work I am often distracted by the hype that surrounds it. He takes a couple of things from contemporary life that are somewhat one dimensional then puts them together to try to create a new meaning. They become carries or cyphers as Koons seeks to get you to think. Nevertheless, I feel his work lacks empathy and intellectual curiosity.  Once you understand the idea behind a piece of his art, there is no hidden depth.  For me, his wealth has become the spectacle and not for the right reason. 
Jeff Koons, Acrobat, Stuart Bush Studio blog
Jeff Koons, Balloon Monkey (Blue) 2006-2013 Newport Gallery All rights reserved by the artist
 
Koons has taken the idea of turning art into a business to a whole new level. He has developed a style of work that does not include the ‘original’ artistic hand. Instead, he employs specialist highly skilled artists and craftspeople to bring his concept to life while he focuses on micromanaging the output.
 
In doing so, Koons creates a new religion for art that celebrates the shallowness of capitalism and celebrity as his ego seeks to promote himself as the modern-day equivalent of the great artists of the past.  
 
Whether you like his work or not his art does come across as uplifting and joyful.  But I am sceptical about the broader intentions of such art. This leads me to find what he does and his unflinching confidence and self-belief admirable, while at the same time, disagreeable.
 

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An artist’s advice to finding art

©Stuart Bush, Law of the jungle, oil on aluminium panel 38 x 76 cm

An artist’s advice to finding art

I have a modern house and l love having modern art on the walls.  My art collection personal to me.
 
I also enjoy spending time in London visiting museums and galleries.  I appreciate having time to look at a variety of artist’s work and considering their different styles and types of work.    Artists are generally in the know and are usually very helpful.  I also try to go to alternative spaces to meet artists. I learn a lot by talking to artists and uncovering who they admire and who influences who, and what they think about other artists.  If the same name keeps cropping up l take notes and do my own research on them.
 
I often go online to find which dealers are working with particular artists. Sometimes I go on Artnet.com to see the prices that artists sell their work for, it gives me a better understanding of the art market.
 
I like to visit art school on their open days like the Royal College of Art or the Royal Academy Schools. It’s an added advantage to spend time in an art school, l may come across a piece l like and try to remember it’s been done before. Having knowledge of what has been done in the past is particularly important if you are looking to buy or make modern art.
 
I listen carefully to the advice l get from galleries, curators and collectors. Personally, I’ve never used art consultants but l have heard that they can be very helpful. I don’t follow trends, l like what l like. I am interested in art that is personal to me.

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Picasso paints want he knows rather what he sees

Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy, Tate Modern (8th March – 9th September)  
 
Installation view of The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy with Pablo Picasso’s Girl Before a Mirror (1932)  © Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2018
 
The subject of this exhibition ‘Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy,’ is the influence of love, fame and tragedy on Picasso’s painting over a one year period.  This year-long output is a rich visual diary which gives away a great deal about the artist; from his professional career to the way he worked and his personal life.  There are more the one hundred pieces of artwork, showing his entanglements with love and fame, his convolutions with colour and form, and his intricacies as the 20th century’s most influential artist.  
 
Using this review, I am seeking to unpick how a highly accomplished artist approached and explored form, colour and space in his work with the intention of helping me in my journey as an artist.
 
The Dream, 1932 Oil paint on canvas 1299 x 968mm Private Collection © Sussession Picasso/DACS London, 2018
 
The first room of this impressive exhibition starts in January and moves forward throughout a particularly special year in Picasso life.  Most of the work is referenced to a single day in 1932.   My first thoughts were how impressive his daily output was. It is hard to imagine working at such speed day after day and producing such high-quality work.  Picasso made his paintings feel like a grand and confident experiment.  He gave himself permission to trust his instincts and senses.  Rather than using direct observation, he preferred to work from memory, focusing beyond what he could see.  The result was an operation of his mind. Picasso said, “I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them.”

 

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Picasso started each painting with a simple outline drawn on the canvas.  The free and loose drawings of curves, contours and form feel as if they spring from discovery. They give his paintings a visual rhythm and a harmony of fragmented structures. The abstract shapes work independently but at the same time together, as they each have a direct impact on the next form.  They all come together creating striking compositions, filled with movement.
 
In working this way, Picasso is always looking for a new way to read the world and express a new visual vocabulary. As my eyes wandered around his paintings l was amazed and intrigued by how effortless Picasso makes his beautiful pictures look.  The colours and forms of the painting respond to each other.  
 
The Rescue 1932 oil paint on canvas 1300 x 975 x 25mm Foundation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel, Sammlung Beyeler ©Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018
Picasso was interested in colour and had the intention to outshine his closet friend and rival Matisse in all areas.  After visiting ‘Matisse: The Cut-Out’, in 2014, and comparing the two artists work, in my view it is clear that Matisse had the upper hand when it came to colour. Picasso often used a joyful palette to create a warm and expressive ambience and at times with paintings like, ‘Seated Woman by a Window’,1932, Picasso’s use of colour creates dynamic energy and audacity of simplicity.  But to me, colour came second in Picasso work. It is not a fundamental part of his work; instead, it is often an afterthought.  
 

External links to review of this exhibition

 
Picasso creative genius lays not in the use of colour as an integral part of his work, but in his ability to understand and manipulate form. Picasso could view the structure from multiple directions, clearly shown in his cubist work, and combine these many viewpoints.  In capturing three-dimensional forms, in two-dimensional drawings, paintings and in his sculpture, Picasso clearly shows a highly advanced genius. His creative talent and mastery are distinctly evident in the subtleties of his advanced spatial awareness. Picasso plainly indicates he has the self-belief and confidence to push this as the dominant theme in his work and this is where he can outperform his friends and rivals.
 
Installation view of EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy with Pablo Picasso’s Nude Green Leaves and Bust ©Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018
I found the exhibition and following one year in the life of Picasso immensely successful.  It enabled me to consider what was going on in many parts of his life and how through evident self-confidence in his own abilities he was able to handle all that life threw at him. This exhibition will have a significant impact on my work. I see similarities in Picasso’s processes and topics that I can learn from.  I think the biggest take away for me from this exhibition is Picasso self-belief and confidence and how prolific and dedicated he was to his work. Picasso’s bristling energy unquestionably comes through.  
 
From the radical simplification of a form, you can see the building blocks of abstraction. He uses his artistic skills to the full to capture three-dimensional understanding.  Each shape seems to be the product of another shape.  Picasso said, “Cubism is neither a seed nor a foetus, but an art dealing primarily with forms, and when a form is reloaded it is there to live its own life.”
 
Installation view of The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy with Pablo Picasso’s The Three Dancers and Woman in the Garden ©Succession Picasso/DACS London 2018

Related post to: Picasso paints what he knows rather than what he sees

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