What I have learnt from Alex Katz

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Alex Katz
Alex Katz Coca Cola Girls Timothy Taylor Gallery ©All rights remain with the artist and the gallery
What I have learnt from Alex Katz;  In 1973 Alex Katz had his first exhibition at the Marlborough Gallery in New York.  At the same time, Abstract Expressionism was riding a wave of popularity in New York.  Katz believed and trusted that what he was interested in was of substance and significance, even though it went against the grain.

 

On first impression Alex Katz’s work appears to be about people and the landscape. However it doesn’t take long to realise that the subject matter is just the outer most boundary of the painting and Katz has a lot more on offer in his paintings.  Katz focuses on ordinary, everyday life as a subject, but his paintings are anything but ordinary.  The style, the present moment and formal qualities are the real focus of his work.

Related blog post; What I learnt from Alex Katz

What I see in the work of Jeff Koons

Even thought he received negative comments about his work from the likes of Clement Greenberg, Katz’s supreme confidence and clarity gave him the self-belief that his paintings could stand up against his peers.  He took on the Abstract Expressionists with their large canvases, and he tried to knock them dead with the power of his images.

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Alex Katz
Alex Katz, Serpentine Gallery installation view 2016 @Alex Katz, All rights reserve with the artist
Katz’s paintings have a cinematic feel with bright, bold figures reminiscent of popular culture and commercial art.  By focusing on ephemeral moments and the everyday on the surface of his paintings, Katz’s found the space to develop a highly stylised painting shorthand.  By having his focus on the present, his work is always about the now. Meanwhile, other art movements came and went as the decades past.

 

The paintings are clearly figurative, but the spaces within the picture creates abstract elements. Katz’s, by simplifying the shape and form of colour in his pictures created a type of grammar that is abstract.  This grammar brings the composition together giving the paintings a spirit and energy.

Related blog post; What I have learnt from Alex Katz

I wish I could paint everyday

The surface of the painting is all done with a quick flick of his brush, allowing a vast canvas to be to be painted in under 5 hours.  The brushwork is simple, creating an almost naive shorthand that is precise and unfussy.  You can tell that Katz isn’t exaggerating about the 1000s of paintings he threw away in order to get the ‘big technique’ mastered.

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Alex Katz
Alex Katz, Black Paintings Timothy Taylor Gallery, London 2017 ©Alex Katz, All rights are reserved by the artist
The style of painting allows for the simplest of effort to get the detail correct.  Using line and colour the whole comes together and takes centre stage.  The painting’s colour and its intensity stand out over the detail.  As Katz’s puts it, the ’style is the content’.  The outcome is a body of work that feels fresh with vitality. 

 

By understanding how Katz has removed the illusion of depth and focused on style and fashion and the light on the surface, I have learnt a lot about how Katz has a created an ever-changing image of the presence.  In 1947 Adolph Gottlieb said, “The role of the artist has always been that of image-maker. Different times require different images…To my mind, certain so-called abstraction is not abstraction at all. On the contrary, it is the realism of our time”. Katz’s paintings really have created the realism and the immediate presence of time.  The ordinary is flat, but it has an intensity about it that is stimulating and sensational.  Alex Katz’s has the right to be satisfied and self-assured, his work is always about the now.

Alex Katz; Coca-Cola Girls is currently on show at the Timothy Taylor Gallery in London until 21 December 2018.

Related blog post; What I have learnt from Alex Katz

The inspirational work of Egon Schiele

Finding a love for collecting art

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Inclination of form, finding a love for collecting art
©Stuart Bush, Inclination of form, oil on canvas
I believe finding a love for collecting art is about finding an artist with a kindred spirit to yourself.  Artists critique all areas of life, from nature to politics to the social system.  They look not just on the surface, but they investigate and ask questions in order to seek new meanings and associations.  
 
When I come across a work that l feel a connection with, I write down the artist’s name.  I also Iook for websites and galleries that exhibit the said artist’s work, and I join their mailing lists. I can then delight in opening my inbox and finding compelling communication.
 
My advice is to broaden your outlook and build up knowledge about different types of art.  By improving your understanding of art, it can help you feel more confident with finding a work of art to purchase.  It is easy to find images and text about artist’s work on the internet, and the information can prove to be very informative.

Related post to; Finding a love for collecting art

A painting has to stand up by itself
 
Understandably, there may be apprehension when starting an art collection.  Artwork can seem a hard thing to put a value on.  Negative thoughts of potentially wasting money can stop impulse purchases. But with careful research, you can avoid the feeling of making an oversight.  A website like artnet.com or a artist’s website can be a very useful place to start.
 
There are many different price points.  Owning an original painting will be at a different price point than owning a print.  It is all about what price you’re happy with.  Next is the question when finding art that you love, is to ask yourself ‘ls there anything more important I need to spend my money on?’ However, if you see an artwork that speaks to you, who cares what price you paid as long you love the work.  
 

Related post to; Finding a love for collecting art

How I see art contributing to society
 
There are a lot of people who look to others to say what is good or bad, valuable and valueless. Following the crowd is easy. On the other hand, sometimes a work of art just grabs you and you can’t stop thinking about it.  When art is this good, any research on the artist or the artist sales history can feel meaningless.  If you love it and the work is set at a reasonable price, the artwork strikes a chord, then buying the artwork straight from the artist can develop into a relationship.  A relationship where the collector is supporting the artist directly.   
 
This kind of relationship is beneficial for both parties.  For the collector, they are collaborating and directly engaging with the artist. The collector can aid and abet the artist to further explore and to realise projects.  For the artist, they appreciate advocates of their art, it boosts their self-belief and helps to finances more work.  
 
Finding a love for art to me is about awakening your senses. Who cares what is fashionable or what other people think.  I don’t think these concepts should be considered when someone purchases art.  
 
When art asks, ‘what is the meaning of this?’ and ‘what’s it all about?’  it makes life visible.  And I can’t help being intrigued.  
 

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A painting has to stand up by itself
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My typical day as a painter

When it is advisable to be wrong, increasing learning in the studio, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
©Stuart Bush, When it is advisable to be wrong 2016 oil on board 45.7 x 60.1 cm
Since I have been a parent, my typical day as a painter starts with waking up between 6 and 6:30 am.   I have a clear head in the morning and I have learnt to appreciate this early start as it allows me to catch up with any writing l have to do. 
 
Everyone else in the house is up by 7:30 and then l enjoy spending quality time with the family.  I help my boys with their homework and get them ready for school. I really appreciate these enjoyable family moments.  I look forward to the short walk to school.  On the way back I have the opportunity to start thinking about my first tasks in the studio.  
 

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Increasing learning in the studio
 
 
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, When it is advisable to wrong, My typical day as a painter
Stuart Bush, When it is advisable to be wrong, work in progress
 
For the next three hours its time to put my head in the rabbit hole.  First, I remove all distractions from the studio as I don’t want to be reactive to any outside influences.  Then l immerse myself in painting.  This typically takes me until my stomach lets me know its lunch time.

External links;

Jerry Saltz: How to be an artist
 
If I have managed to achieve all this by lunchtime I feel like I have already won the day.  I have completed sixty minutes or so of writing. Ninety minutes with my family and two to three hours of painting.  Now that my main priorities are achieved, I see the rest of the day as flexible.  If I still feel inspired, I can return to the studio or I can get on with business or home tasks until it’s time to pick the children up from school. 
 
I always look forward to walking to school and being able to ask the children about their day. I then spend the rest of the day with the family. I may do some reading, writing or play games with the family or even do fitness exercises.  If I have any free time, I try to catch up on what is left of my business tasks or studio tasks. 
 
Then the only task left to do is to decide what am going to paint the next day.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, increasing learning in the studio, My typical day as a painter
Stuart Bush, When it is advisable to be wrong, work in progress

Ernest Hemingway offered this advice for writing, but I think it suits any creative activity. “The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next. If you do that every day when you are writing a novel, you will never be stuck. That is the most valuable thing I can tell you so try to remember it.” I have found the advice very valuable.

Related blog posts; My typical day as a painter

Places I go for inspiration

Wishing for dyslexia

The Rush, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
©Stuart Bush The rush 2016 oil on canvas 50 x 70 cm – SOLD
I recently read a book by Malcolm Gladwell called David and Goliath. The theme of the book highlights how we are misled about the nature of our advantages and disadvantages.  Gladwell explains that it isn’t always correct that our disadvantages preventing us being successful in life.  “We have a definition in our heads of what an advantage is — and the definition isn’t right. And what happens as a result? It means that we make mistakes. It means that we misread battles between underdogs and giants. It means that we underestimate how much freedom there can be in what looks like a disadvantage.”
 
In chapter four, Gladwell starts with the question, ‘You won’t wish dyslexia on your child, or would you?.’ Gladwell explains that when you’re dyslexic to overcome reading and writing issues, dyslexics really have to work extremely hard. That extra effort to compensate for your disadvantages develops into new advantages.  Malcolm says, “If you take away the gift of reading, you give the gift of listening.”  In my case rather than listening I developed the gift of seeing.
 
While battling with comprehension as a dyslexic, I had to concentrate extremely hard. I learnt to look harder and more deeply while fighting to understand and comprehend what I was reading.

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The benefits of adversity
The usual strategy for learning to read is to be able to break down words and understand each syllable. Enabling the reader to form the words by saying the sounds. I was told by a psychologist when I completed a dyslexia test that I have learnt to memorise thousands of words whole.  For this strategy to work, I have developed an advanced visual memory to compensate for my weakness.  To me, this makes a lot of sense as I am not good with reading and spelling words I am less familiar with.
 
 
I believe that what Gladwell talked about in his book is very interesting. I think this idea broadens as Gladwell noted and is the reason why many dyslexics end up becoming artists. Through seeing and thinking thoroughly, they continue to struggle to understand the world.  Dyslexics are often resourceful individuals, and they continually look for a solution. Dyslexics develop and build an advanced visual memory, they start to notice what others ignore.  
 
This happens to me, I start to ask questions when I notice something I find interesting. I ask, has anyone else observed this?  If they have, surely they would have painted it or draw attention to it another way.  I continue looking around to see if anyone has in case I have overlooked it and missed it.  After a while, I began to trust that these things that I have noticed have probably been ignored.  
 

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How technology Helped Me Cheat Dyslexia
Then I start the journey of processing these things of interest. Looking at them even more profoundly. I play with them in my head and in a sketchbook turning them into a variety of outcomes in order to see what works.  The hardest part is to look and see if I can turn it into successful artwork.  This is really what an artist’s role is, to think deeply about what hasn’t been noticed and draw attention to it.
 
Gladwell highlights this fact in the book, “An extraordinarily high number of entrepreneur are dyslexic about a third…There are two possible interpretations for this remarkable fact. One is that this extraordinary group of people triumphed in spite of their disability. That they are so smart and so creative, that nothing, not even a lifetime of struggling with reading could stop them. The second more intriguing possibility that they achieve in part because of the disorder.  That they learnt something in their struggle to be at an enormous advantage. Would you wish dyslexia on your child?”
 
George Bernard Shaw, “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world,  The unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore, all progress relies on the unreasonable man.”
 

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Dyslexia isn't going to stop me

Kerry James Marshall: History of painting

Kerry James Marshall, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Kerry James Marshall, Untitled (Underpainting), 2018 courtesy of the David Zwirner Gallery
Kerry James Marshall, the American artist, is increasingly being recognised as a significant painter and modern master.  His work confronts questions about what is represented in art and more importantly what has been left out.  In this review of Kerry James Marshall: History of Painting at David Zwirner’s gallery in London, I want to look at the way Marshall uses in-depth knowledge and understanding of art history to inform his work and inspire a new generation of artists.  
 
Kerry James Marshall was born in Birmingham, Alabama and grew up in Los Angles.  He currently lives in Chicago.  At the beginning of Marshall’s journey to becoming a successful artist, he started, like most students by learning to copy.  He studied a wide range of art from the great masters from European history to abstract expressionism and pop art and all the essential work in-between.  As a result of Marshall devouring and truly penetrating what had gone on before, he developed a broad theoretical understanding and technical skills.
 

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A review of Sarah Sze's exhibition at Victoria Miro Gallery, London
When it came to choosing his style Marshall had an informed understanding.  He decided to work with a deeply felt, intense narrative style that he learnt from grand European history paintings. Marshall felt this style of picture making is familiar to many people and would be the best way for him to help derive meaning from our lives.  
Kerry James Marshall, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Kerry James Marshall, Untitled (Large Colours) (2018) ©Kerry James Marshall, Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner
The painting titled, ‘Untitled (Underpainting)’ 2018 highlights how Marshall has learnt to evaluate art. It is a painting of African Americans children enjoying and learning about art in a museum.  It references many great works like Samuel Morse’s, ‘Gallery of the Louvre’ (1831-3). A painting where rich, white people are enjoying a rich visual field of pictures in a gallery.  The African Americans figures in the picture are having a great time, enjoying looking at grand paintings made by American Africans.  The narrative blatantly challenges how the identity of African Americans are displayed. 
 

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Kerry James Marshall said, “When most people go to a big museum like the Louvre, it reaffirms their idea of what real art is supposed to look like. And if you keep going to the Louvre and Tate Britain and you don’t see black people in those pictures, then you don’t think black people belong in these kinds of pictures… People need to start thinking that these pictures belong in those places, too.”
 
Portrait painting is often intertwined with character, wealth and status. In Marshall’s portrait paintings we see the world with fresh eyes. In ‘Day and Night’ 2018, he asks us to stop and consider our oversimplified misconceptions.  Marshall’s paintings, ask the viewer to look into the eyes of African Americans, to reconsider the opinions, stories and stereotypes they have been given. To re-evaluate what is valuable, neglected and demeaned.
 
‘Untitled (Large Colours)’ 2018, is a competent abstract painting that deals with the language of painting where discovery and execution happen simultaneously.  It discusses the emotional impact and essence of art.
 

Related post: Kerry James Marshall: History of painting

Tomma Abts Serpentine Exhibition
 
Marshall’s auction series of works is about the commercial value of art.  It is based on the prices of art at auction. Marshall is understandably asking questions about the importance of art considering he recently sold a painting for £15.6 million at auction.
 
Kerry James Marshall, Stuart Bush Studio Blog
Kerry James Marshall History of Painting (May 16 2007), 2018 courtesy of The David Zwirner Gallery
This month Marshall has been named the most influential contemporary artist in the 17th edition of the ArtReview Power 100.   This shows that he has become an inspirational figure to a new generation of artists. Marshall leads the way encouraging them to believe they too can be successful and have their work in these critical artistic establishments.  
 
His approach of starting at the beginning and learning everything of importance has been instrumental in Kerry James Marshall’s success.  With the simple goal of wanting to make the best painting he could, Marshall followed the proven track of many artists. Marshall paints as a form of activism to promote, challenge and ask questions about how people from his background are portrayed.  Now with his painting is institutions around the world, he steps forward as an inspirational artist trying to rebalance the objectivity of art intuitions.  Marshall leads the way to change the way art and art establishment conducts its view of the world. 

Related post: Kerry James Marshall: History of painting

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A section of ourselves as a commodified object

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, A section of ourselves as a commodified object, A section of ourselves as a commodified object
©Stuart Bush, A section of ourselves as a commodified object, oil on aluminium panel, 80 x 120cm
To achieve a successful painting like, ‘A section of ourselves as a commodified object’, I want to understand what it is I am really trying to make. I have a deep need to be creative and communicate something significant about what I see. I love painting, my ambition is to make the best painting I can make. For me, a transformative experience takes place at the level of the ordinary.  
 
When evaluating a picture, it is interesting to consider that the essences of the surface is a pattern of colours, lines, texture, forms and space.  Shape and form fit into the frame, as the structure of the painting creates a visual complexity.  I find a dynamic placement satisfying and enticing as it encourages eyes to follow a predetermined direction.  
 

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What it takes to paint something original
By turning figurative forms into a flat plane, I hope to make a visually engaging and attention holding painting.  I am also creating a comment about how the abstract figure in the history of art is turned into a sign or symbol for market value.  In effect, I recycle, reuse and take advantage of our human form and individuality for the commercialisation of the self and of our human identity. 
 
My focus isn’t on financial gain.  However, an artist, like everyone else, needs to make a living. I like the idea of art for art’s sake but a painting whether you like it or not turns into a commodity. As an artist, I live off what I make and of the form of others in my work.  
 

Inspiring external related link;

Michael Landy's Artange project 'Breakdown'

I cannibalise the individual form into an image for commercial value. The commercialisation of the self and human identity de-humanises us. This is the reason why I paint a section of ourselves as a commodified object.

Compared to the various others ways to make a living this seems an honest and honourable one.  I am not saying there is anything wrong with making a living from art or any other form of making a living.  By trying to make the best painting I can, I wanted to look at this most fundamental part of the art.  Looking at the deal that follows.  The legacy of the history of art is its commercialisation.
 
I don’t have to sell my work, but there isn’t much point in making it unless other people see it. By getting to grips with all this, I hope to make the best painting I can make.
 

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I wish I could paint everyday

A painters approach to street photography – Stuart Bush Studio Blog

©Stuart Bush, untitled photograph, A painters approach to street photography
©Stuart Bush, untitled photograph, A painters approach to street photography
I found the question of where to start as an artist after art school an easy one. I had a desire to capture something about now; the present moment in the city.  My camera seemed an obvious place to start. I picked up my camera and took pictures.  Cartier Bresson labelled it the “the decisive moment.”  I wanted to capture a split second of an ever-changing mad rush.  By doing so, I found a way to make art; I discovered a painters approach to street photography. 
 
My walk with a camera started with no intention of where I was going; not in my steps and not in my art.  Each time I went out with my camera, I spent more time reflecting on the photographs I took. Looking for a breadcrumb to follow.
 
Out of the hundreds of photographs, I knew there was a way forward. My own unique way forward. I know I was interested in something significant, but it was impossible to put it into words.  I was interested in elements of form, of architecture and individuals, and formal qualities of a composition.  Over time this vision developed into a kind of transcendence. A nowness of this specific point in time. Of my time and our time.
 

Related post to; A painters approach to street photography

The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
My camera works an extension of me, I use it as a tool to capture my artistic vision.  I am looking for the right something. When the right individual with the right background, in the right composition, comes together in the frame.  I hope to capture an emotion and feeling of being there. To add a sense of place.
©Stuart Bush, untitled, street photography, A painters approach to street photography
©Stuart Bush, untitled photograph, A painters approach to street photography
When I am out taking photographs is not essential for me to communicate with the people I am photographing.  I try to be invisible, I don’t draw attention to myself.  I very rarely use a direct likeness of the individuals in my paintings, only sometimes in my drawings.  If I was ever asked what I was doing which I never have, I don’t think people would understand. How can I explain I am capturing the randomness of life. This quest to me feels unique.  
 

Related links; A painters approach to street photography

Street photography.com
I paint what I photograph rather than exhibit the photographs.  The are many reasons why.  I have become less interested in narratives and less interested in the details of the image. I want to abstract something out of those moments. To strip away the visual noise, to look for something beneath, where people and the city emerge in a meaningful and surprising way.  At the end of the day, we all see and notice these fleeting moments.  I am trying to ask what does it say? What does it all mean?
 
A fated poise, a combination of colour, texture and cut of the clothes translates into our culture. Street photography can become quite obsessive. It takes dedication to capture that moment. That purely visual moment.  It is gone so quickly there is hardly any time to capture it.  I see it all being about chance. An accidental chance.  In that accident, it says something about being here on this rock in this moment of time, that I don’t think can be said in any other way.
 

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How I see art contributing to society

The influential work of Francis Bacon – Stuart Bush Studio Blog

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Hopes and Fears, The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
©2016 Stuart Bush, Hopes and Fears, (2007) oil on canvas 150 x 85 cm
When I was starting out as an artist, I was having trouble with feelings about the purpose of our human existence. I related to Karl Marx talking about the problems of consumerism and the alienation of labour. Marx stated that if you are cut off from the fruits of your work, then you are cut off from your creativity, and you lose your sense of self. This introspection on existentialism and the influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter as a creative outlet for my thoughts.
 
I realised I was happiest when I was making something.  It needed to be something for me that doesn’t have the main aim of making money.  I feel that this is one of the main problems with the western consumeristic society. People often lose connection with their output. They complete a task just to make money, just to survive. I believe the goal of making money causes psychological problems with our individual purpose and happiness.
 

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How I see art contributing to society
During the process of making art, I feel the artwork becomes an extension of me. I get closer to my deeper self.  Through painting, my purpose stretches out before me. I realised no one else can make another painting precisely the same. No-one else has my thoughts. This powerful idea that I am unique and I can communicate what I feel really resonates with my heart.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Francis Bacon, Figure at the base of crucifixion, The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
©Francis Bacon, Figures at the base of crucifixion 1944, 1 panel part of a triptych
After learning about Francis Bacon at art school, and seeing Bacon’s work at several exhibitions in London, including his major retrospective at the Tate in 2008, I saw the way forward. I immediately related to his work and understood it.  As Bacon puts it, “art is about trying to make something out of the chaos of existence.”
 
To enable me to communicate my feeling of angst and estrangement with the world, I realised I could paint the figure in the city. Since I grew up in the country, I found the city fascinating and it is where I felt increasingly heighten feelings of alienation.
 

Related links: The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter

Tate interactive tour of 2008 Francis Bacon exhibition
 
I was in a trance by the power of Bacon’s large canvases. Bacon depicted the complexity and chaos that was going on around me and inside me.  His paintings focused on the invisible forces that underlie me. I strongly relate to the feelings of angst and disorientation.  
 
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, The Kingdom, The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter
©Stuart Bush, The Kingdom, oil on canvas 150 x 85 cm
I realised Bacon wasn’t only interested in directly painting a representation of life. He wanted to heighten the viewer’s feelings. His paintings were created by using raw instinct and chance.  Often there is a single figure in Bacon’s paintings, the individual that creates a tremendous force that twists, contorts and stretches out.  Bacon’s striking depictions stirred my emotions with the immediacy, and with the deep and lasting impact of his art.
 
I deeply related to Bacon’s paintings and felt painting was the perfect way I could communicate my thoughts.  What I like about Bacon’s approach is that he is not trying to understand the human condition, Bacon realises he cannot.  If he could explain it, there would be no reason to paint it.  Bacon was instead trying to get you to feel what he feels.  He portrays a figure, not as an educated, cultured, pillar of the community but instead as nothing but a raw piece of meat. It is direct, honest and compelling.  Francis Bacon explains it eloquently, “the job of the artist is always to deepen the mystery.”  Francis Bacon had a tremendous impact on me.  Inspiring me to follow in his footsteps and to become a painter.
 

Related posts: The influential work of Francis Bacon lead me to become a painter

The inspiral work of Egon Schiele - Stuart Bush Studio Blog

What it takes to paint something original

paint something original
©Stuart Bush, Strange Heart Sings, oil on board 30 x 40 cm
When I started out on my journey, like most art students, my ultimate goal was to communicate what I see.  I was inspired by other artist’s work. As a consequence, I wanted to make my own significant contribution to culture. When everything has been done before, to have any chance of achieving this goal, I realised it’s important to understand how to paint something original and unique. In this post, I discuss what I have uncovered on my artistic journey.
 
In the book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell explains his thoughts about his ‘10,000-hour-rule’ as, “the magic number of greatness.”  Gladwell’s idea is that originality only comes after spending 10,000 hours mastering a subject.  This rule makes a lot of sense to me. It is helpful as a guide to appreciating what it takes to paint something original.
Stuart Bush Studio, No bodies fault, I wish I could paint every day
©Stuart Bush Nobodies fault detail,
I believe looking is the most essential part of being an artist, especially for a painter.  Only after looking can you begin to realise what has been overlooked and then you can start to recognise what is already valued. Plus after reading about and viewing a lot of accomplished art you can start to understand the importance of making great art, and that originality is subjective. As I became aware of what art critics and sophisticated people thought l started to develop my own ideas about what was successful or unsuccessful. 

Related post; What it takes to paint something original

Jealously of other artist's work
This was the beginning of finding my own voice and my own unique visual ideas as an artist then an armed with a pencil, a blank sheet of paper and an open mind l can be transported to a place where ideas become instinctive, intuitive and spontaneous. 
 
I realise I am more likely to stumble across originality when I am making and taking risks. Accidents from unintended footprints, coffee cups rings, photocopiers, spills and other accidents all have their place. They happen when I least expect them and I learn as much from these apparent failures as I do from successes.  
©Stuart Bush, He has never been in love, he doesn’t even know what love is. Gouache on cartridge paper, 43 x 24 cm
 
Open creative sessions leave my thoughts uncovered and on display in their raw state and my ego is left aside. The energy and emotions in the preliminary drawings come from this outburst of freedom. They can be refined by repeating on another sheet. These ideas can be further explored and refined, but at that point, the conscious self comes back into the room.  The work from open-ended creation sessions can often be more prized than the problem solving finished work that follows. Getting this balance right is an essential part of painting something original.

External link; What it takes to paint something original

Is originality in art overrated? - Royal Academy of Art
 
After completing the preliminary studies l often don’t know the potential of the work. Often l store it away and revisit it at a later time.  This time away helps me to realise and appreciate its potential. I am always hoping to find an appropriate form that brings everything together in order to discover something fresh and insightful.  
Stuart Bush Studio, the rush
©Stuart Bush The rush 2016 oil on board 50 x 70 cm
Nevertheless, it is important to throw away what doesn’t work and quickly move on. This can be one of the biggest stumbling blocks for an artist.  New work can be a shadow or an echo of what the artist has seen or experienced before.  Selecting, editing and reworking is an essential process that leads to originality.  The artist’s studio is a place for demolition, revival and transformation.
 
Chuck Close, the New York painter, has this to say,  
“We often don’t know what we want to do, but we sure as hell know what we don’t want to do.  So the choice not to do something is often more important than the choice to do something.”  
I have discovered that a problem creation process is much more effective in finding exciting and original ideas than a problem-solving approach.
 

Related post; What it takes to paint something original

I wish I could paint every day

A review of Sean Scully’s work by Stuart Bush

A review of Sean Scully’s work by Stuart Bush – ‘Uninsideout’ exhibition, BlainSouthern London until 17th November

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Sean Scully review
Sean Scully, What Makes Us, 2017. ©Sean Scully Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet
In a career spanning 6 decades, Sean Scully in 2018 has 10 solo shows around the world, including an exhibition of sculpture at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 6 January 2019.  During this review of Sean Scully’s work at ‘Uninsideout’ exhibition at BlainSouthern in London, I want to discuss Scully’s approach to the use form and colour and the intensity in his work.
 
The Irish born abstract painter Sean Scully grow up in London.  He later moved to New York where he established a studio.  Sean’s work explores a grid structure as a way to interpret the urban and natural landscape.  
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Sean Scully
Sean Scully, Uninsideout, 2018, Installation view, ©Sean Scully, Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet
Sean’s initial interest in art came from viewing Van Gogh ‘The Chair’ at the Tate every weekend for 6 weeks. The painting profoundly moved Sean. He admired how the painting was honest and direct. It lit a spark in Sean and lead to his early work.

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Sean approach to painting has a similar intensity to Van Gogh’s ’The Chair’. He responses to thoughts and emotions with genuine integrity. Sean’s grid structure enables him to capture the rough, falling down feeling of the city. The muted light and the geometry grid facilitates a way to capture the unique beauty of the subject.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Sean Scully review
Sean Scully, Uninsideout, 2018, Installation view, ©Sean Scully, Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet
Sean Scully explaining his work, “I am paraphrasing nature, I am making the grid which is an intellectual framework, that we have invented, in order to order our cities.  I fill it up with information that is already in the world.  From the sky, the trees, the rivers and so on, all those sensual forms of information are gathered into the work to inform it, to enrich it, to bring it into the human spirit.”
In advance of the act of painting, Scully carefully works out the drawing of the grid and his palette of colours. This takes away many decisions while painting, and leaves space for a surprising amount of freedom in the making. Scully can focus on the noise, movement and pattern of the surface.
 

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The paintings are inspired by the cityscape with blocks and forms, or by horizontal lines forms a natural landscape opening up space for interpretation and mystery to the viewer.  Unlike conceptual art, where the intellectual idea is clean and has a resolution, Sean’s paintings are like open questions allowing the viewer’s mind to wander across its surface. This is because the thinking and doing are in-separatable, it causes the viewer to always fall short of understanding the artist’s direct experiences that inspired the art.  
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Sean Scully review
Sean Scully, What Makes Us Too, 2017. ©Sean Scully Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet
Scully has a sensitivity to colour.  His palette is inspired by the colours of nature and space around him. They are always finely calibrated colours, consistently hushed and sombre tones echoing the landscape. There is always a sense of the material in the work.
 
In the painting ‘What Makes Us Too’ (2017) he uses a brighter palette of colours.  This work inspires thoughts of the exuberance and rhythm of contemporary urban life, including sexuality, lipstick and power.  This series of work, as a result, is more decorative than his usual work.
 

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Scully has said he doesn’t like using unsophisticated bright or brash colours. He much prefers rich, refined tones. Colours that are not there to make an encounter happen.  The colours in Scully palette come with their own natural, highly developed meaning which is delicate and complex. They are less dominating and with subtle degrees of graduation.
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Sean Scully, Landline Near Blue, 2018, ©Sean Scully Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet
I really enjoyed seeing the varied body of work in this exhibition at BlainSouthern.  Through focusing on the surface, Scully is able to reduce the decisions he has to make. This way of painting leaves space to focus on the two crucial aspects of his painting practice. The first is the intensity of the art.  Through having many of the decisions worked out in advance, Scully can concentrate on the distinct characterises.  The precise meaning is brought into existence by amplifying how powerful and intense the painting is.
 
The other important aspect of Scully’s paintings is about how two things come together through a visual intelligence.  As Scully explains, “This really is the human problem how we come together.  How do the things in the world come together.”  As Sean Scully says, “Abstract art really is like music without words.” Scully’s paintings allude and invoke the way we experience the landscape as a mental state rather than a conscious effort.
Stuart Bush Studio Blog, Sean Scully review
Sean Scully, Landline Near Blue, 2018, ©Sean Scully Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet
 

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