The search for originality in the artist’s studio

©Stuart Bush, Nobodies fault, oil on board 70.2 x 50.4 x 3.6cm – £1400 + shipping enquiry

 

A space to play, where anything is possible is such an important place for a creative person.  Having a space to go to and process the world and its complexities is extremely valuable and I feel very lucky to have the freedom around my full-time job and family life.

 

There is something very special about making work with just a few strokes with an open mind in an instant.  A pencil or brush in my hand with an open mind allows me to be transported to a place where ideas are instinctive, intuitive and spontaneous.  Accidents from unintended foot prints, rings from coffee cups, photocopiers, spills and accidents all have their place.   These studio sessions often leaves my thoughts uncovered and on display in their raw state where my ego is left aside.

 

These ideas can be explored and refined but at this point the conscious self comes back into the room.  The energy and emotions in the preliminary drawings and paintings that came from this outburst of freedom can often be lifted onto another sheet for further refinement. The open-ended problem creation can often be more prized than the problem solving finished work that follows.

 

I find that at this point, just after the preliminary studies, I don’t know what I have got.  I often find a place to store this work and revisit it at a later time.  This time lapse helps me to realise what I have really got.  This is when l contemplate the potential and hopefully uncover original ideas.  After all, everything has been done before, very little is original.  New work is often a shadow or an echo of what the artist has seen or experienced before.  This process can also often lead to selecting, editing and reworking, to look for originality.  The artist’s studio is also a place for destruction, recovery and transformation.

 

Chuck Close, the New York painter, has this to say,  “We often don’t know what we want to do, but we sure as hell know what we don’t want to do.  So the choice not to do something is often more important than the choice to do something.”  

 

I find problem creation as a process is much more effective in finding interesting art than a problem-solving approach, Duchamp said: “the artist has only 50% of the responsibility, and that is to get the work out, it is completed by the viewer.”

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