Review – Transient Space at the Parafin Gallery, London

No Omega, Sentry and Superstrasse by Mike Ballard and Tracer video by Melanie Manchot. Photo courtesy of Parafin Gallery, London
I often walk the streets of London and wonder about the space I am looking at and the transient passing of time.  I wonder what I should take from my short lived fleeting moments.  This is the subject of a group show at Parafin Gallery in London titled the ‘Transient Space’ as artists Mike Ballard, Nathan Coley, Keith Coventry, Tim Head, Melanie Manchat and Abigail Reynolds explore the space in the city.
 
Parafin Gallery just off Bond Street has been open for three years and shows emerging and established artists.  While I was there, I felt that l had the two floors to myself in the slender venue with plenty of time to browse and enjoy the fascinating show.
Tracing the city with their feet, a free runner on top of the Sage Gateshead in Melanie Manchots, Mesmerising, video installation, Tracer, 2013. Photograph Melanie Manchot; courtesy Parafin, London
Trying to make sense of transient space for many would seem futile.  I’m sure the general public would ask why would you want to make sense of the space.  Isn’t space just space, what possibly could be said about it?  However, focusing on similarly unimportant and the overlooked is the role of the artist.
Tracing the city with their feet, a free runner on top of the Sage Gateshead in Melanie Manchots, Mesmerising, video installation, Tracer, 2013. Photograph Melanie Manchot; courtesy Parafin, London
These artists are like particle physicists, interested in the basic elements of space and mass, and how are they created.  Instead of trying to understand the world through science and maths they are creating a springboard to express ideas and emotions through art.  By doing so, they capture the symphony of the city and together they fill the exhibition space, using their art to prompt a response and to allow the viewer to develop a better understanding of what has previously been overlooked.  The French composer Claude Debussy said, “Music is the space between the notes.”  This group of artists are focusing on just that, the space between the notes.
 
Parade Sculptures, 2015 by Nathan Coley; courtesy Parafin, London
Many works caught my attention starting with Nathan’s Coley’s, Firas, Ido, Rere, Ruth and Rima from 2015 made out of aluminium and perspex and approximately 130 x 35 x 35cm each.  Nathan Coley studied at the Glasgow School of Art from 1985 to 1989, and in 2007 he was shortlisted for the Turner Prize.  Before I knew that Coley has said his sculptures, ‘refer to a state of being, architectures subjected to a physical shift and partially destroyed due to an act of conflict,’  I was enjoying the way the models were presented as simple constructions of architecture made in aluminium and perspex.  This extra layer of information and with the handles on the sculptures it gives a protester the opportunity to raise the base of the pieces of sculptures aloft, elevating them, making the architecture into political statements. Nathan Coley believes these places have weight and value and he encourages the viewer to see the world from his perspective.  These architectural placards instil belief, belief in the importance of humanised spaces and the visible landscape of architecture.  It is a a declaration of sentiment that these places should be cherished and these precious spaces not blown up through conflicts.   
 
Installation shot, The past is always present, Buckingham Palace by Abigail Reynolds. Sharing Smoke, Neighbourhood Watch Mike Ballard 2017 – Photograph by Abigail Reynolds, cortesy of Parafin Gallery
 
Meanwhile, Mike Ballard’s work is interested in the grainy side of the city, his interest clearly comes from his time as a graffiti artist before studying at art Central Saint Martins.  Through a fascination of his abstract marks in forgotten places, Mike turns the overlooked into a beautiful language and abstract art form.  Not as a painter of original abstractions but by using the city as a readymade, balancing surfaces of concrete, wood and street signs with partly removed stickers and images into a visual noise of the spaces.  They capture decisive abstract moments turning them into things of beauty.  Mike’s work encourages you to focus on the fabric of the city, so you never see it the same again.  After seeing his work, l feel encouraged to further my own understanding of taking a slice of the city in search of the poetry of the city.  The show continues until 16th September.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *